Going uphill on the Green Road heading South West out of Ardglass you get a fabulous view of Coney Island (see separate entry) and the Mourne Mountains. For the many attractions in the Mournes

Going uphill on the Green Road heading South West out of Ardglass on the Lecale Way you get a fabulous view of Coney Island (see separate entry) and the Mourne Mountains. There are many visitor attractions in around the Mournes, many of which can be seen at   http://www.visitmournemountains.co.uk/

Mountains of Mourne.(traditionally spelt Morne) are named in English for the Gaelic clann called the Múghdhorna of Oirel or ‘Airgíalla’ who pushed out the Norman invaders from the area around the 1400’s. These people gave us modern surnames Hassan or O’Hassain (from the famous Oisin), MacCearnaigh (Kearney), O’Carroll, Connolly, O’Hare, McSherry and many others.

Gaelic speakers in South Down still refer to the Mornes by their original name of ‘Na Beanna Boirche’.They include the highest mountains in Ulster. The highest of these is Slieve Donard at 850 metres (2,790 ft). The Mournes is an area of outstanding natural beauty and has been proposed as the first national park in Northern Ireland.

The mountains are immortalised in a song written by Percy French in 1896, "The Mountains of Mourne" ‘where the mountains of Morne sweep down to the sea’. The song has been recorded by many artists, including Don McLean. The Mourne Mountains also influenced C.S. Lewis to write The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe and were mentioned in John Lennon's song "The Luck of the Irish" on the album Some Time in New York City.

The scenery of the Mourne Mountains have also provided the backdrop for a number of productions, including Philomena and Game of Thrones.

See also http://www.nitb.com/Destinations/MourneMountainsNewsandUpdates.aspx